History

Back
  Key Stage 3  Key stage 4
  Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11
Autumn 1 Anglo Saxons and Vikings - The Anglo Saxon invasion and it's impact on England. Viking invasions and the clashes that they had with the Anglo-Saxons and the impact the Vikings had on England as a whole. Renaissance and Reformation- The great explorers and how the world was opening up. Key features of the Renaissance in Europe and the impact on England. Students then focus on Martin Luther and how this influenced Henry and his 'Great Matter'. The British Empire - The motivations behind the empire and focus on the experiences of British rule in India and Ireland. Medicine Through Time - GCSE Paper 1: Medieval Medicine and the case study of the Black Death. The Renaissance with the case study of the Great Plague of 1665. Medicine and the Western Front - This the part A of the Paper 1 unit, this focuses on how medicine developed during the First World War. Pupils develop their understanding of historical sources.
Autumn 2 Norman Conquest - The succession crisis and who will be the next king of England. The key battles of 1066 are studied with the reasons for the Norman Victory. How the Normans took and established control Tudor England into the Civil War - Relgious change under the later Tudors and Elizabeth. Elizabeth's religious settlement and how religion was at the root of conflict which lead to the English Civil War  Empire and links to World War I - The 'Scramble for Africa' and the links to this to the First World War. Causes of the War, the nature of the First World War and key fronts and battles Medicine Through Time - Medicine during the Industrial Revolution with the case study of the Cholera outbreak in London, then Modern medicine which has the case study of the fight against lung cancer Weimar and Nazi Germany - Paper 3. The impact of the First World War on Germany, the setting up of the Weimar Republic, the challenges this new constitution faced.
Spring 1 Medieval life and the power of the church - Early medieval monarchs, castle building and the structure of the medieval village. The vital and powerful role of the church in Medieval life and early Isamic states and their beliefs 17th Century Britain - The English Civil War and the controversial figure of Oliver Cromwell is studied as well as the restoration of the Monarchy and then the Glorious Revolution Versailles and the Rise of the Dictators- This unit unpicks the end of the First World War, its aftermath and how this and other economic factors of the interwar period leads to the rise of dictators such as Hitler and Mussolini. Medicine and the Western Front - This the part A of the Paper 1 unit, this focuses on how medicine developed during the First World War. Weimar and Nazi Germany - The rise of the Nazi party and the reasons for their taking power in Germany. Nazi consolidation of power
Spring 2 The Crusades - The power of the Medieval church and the reasons people went on a crusade. The Crusades including the First and the Third and the roles of Saladin and Richard the Lionheart. The Slave Trade -The history of the early American Colonies and learn how the tran-atlanic slave trade was established and maintained and then how it was abolished Nazi Germany and the Holocaust - The nature of Nazi rule in Germany and how the German people were controlled Weimar and Nazi Germany - This is paper 3 of the students GCSE. The impact of the First World War on Germany, the setting up of the Weimar Republic, the challenges this new constitution faced. Weimar and Nazi Germany - The nature of Nazii control. Inferences and judgements about life in Nazi Germany.
Summer 1 Medieval Power and Conflict - The problems that Mediaeval kings faced such as Henry II and Thomas Beckett, John and the Barons war and the signing of the Magna Carta and Simon De Monfort and the role of Parliament. How Wales was brought under control, the significance of the Black Death and the Peasants Revolt The American and French Revolutions- This unit focuses on the nature of revolutions. The causes and impact of these and their impact on Britain. World War II - Key battles of the Second World War including, Dunkirk, Battle of Britain and D-Day. Weimar and Nazi Germany -The rise of the Nazi party and the reasons for their taking power in Germany. Nazi consolidation of power Revision
Summer 2 Medieval Power and Conflict - This unit focuses on the Wars of the Roses, Yorkist rule and Richard the III and the Battle of Bosworth. The Industrial Revolution - The nature of this period, the huge changes it had on Britain and it's people. The Cold War - The aftermath of the Second World War, the division of Germany and the consequences of this, the roles of individuals such as Stalin and Kruschev. Developments of the Cold War such as the Cuban Missile Crisis and the building of the Berlin Wall are studied. Weimar and Nazi Germany - The nature of Nazii control and study historical sources to make inferences and judgements about life in Nazi Germany. Exams

 

History 

Why are we teaching a knowledge-rich curriculum; how is it different?

Our history curriculum is designed so that pupils can understand the story of Britain and how key world events fit into our island’s story. The knowledge rich curriculum uses a mainly chronological approach which gives pupils a framework to develop a rich understanding of the key events of the past and explain how they are connected. A key aim of this curriculum is to help pupils come to appreciate the complexity of the past. For example, pupils will be able to understand that historical events have multiple and complex causes and consequences. This knowledge of the past will enable pupils to engage in contemporary world events with a deeper understanding of their historical context.

 

Why are we teaching this content?

There are two main considerations that help us choose what we teach: 1) content that will help pupils come to understand the discipline of history so they can eventually think independently about the past and 2) content that will help pupils develop cultural literacy so they can understand common reference points in our popular culture. To explain this second consideration further, we teach our curriculum because the events/people covered have cultural significance, which will enable pupils to engage in the wider world. These areas include an awareness of democracy, power of the church and the causes and impact of conflict. Together these two considerations will  help pupils gain awareness of British culture(s) and their place within this culture. For example, we have chosen to study Henry VIII in Year 8, due to the impact commonly attributed to him in shaping Britain; but we use the study of Henry VIII to help pupils think critically about causal questions. Pupils can choose to study Henry VIII's reign in more detail by taking history at GCSE syllabus.

 

Why are we teaching it in this order?

Our curriculum is mainly delivered in chronological order. Chronology in the past has always been an area that pupils have found challenging, so by being explicit with this and teaching the story ‘in order’ we can support pupil’s understanding. Units that overlap chronologically are carefully considered as to how and when they’re delivered, thereby making sense to pupils. For example, the Industrial Revolution, American and French Revolutions and slavery topics are discrete but overlap, so we give pupils the ‘big picture’ and zoom in and out to remind them of how these events link together.

 

What do pupils need to remember and be able to do in this subject?

Pupils need to be able to place key historical events and people in a chronological sequence and have an understanding of the causes and consequences of these. As pupils progress through the curriculum, they will be able to analyse and evaluate these events. Fundamentally we want pupils to remember and understand the story of Britain and how key world events fit into ‘our island’ story. Pupils will read and draw inferences from a range of historical sources. 

 

What methods do we use to help pupils secure this knowledge in long-term memory? 

Methods used are quizzing at the start of each lesson, with a mixture of more recent questions but always including questions from previous topics and previous years. We use timelines frequently, so that pupils can place events in a sequential order and reflect on how events they have previously learnt connect to the ones they are currently learning. 

 

What methods do we use to help pupils secure this knowledge in long-term memory and apply it in complex tasks?

We draw comparisons and connections between current and previous units so that pupils can find historical themes that run throughout. These connections enable them to produce extended writing which analyses a range of historical concepts such as cause and consequence, change and continuity and similarity and difference.