Geography

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  Key Stage 3  Key stage 4
  Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11
Autumn 1 Mapping and Agriculture Maps as graphical representations, Map projections, Types of farming and where they are found in the UK, Physical and human factors that influence farming, Changes over time to farming, How farming has changed the landscape. River Environments Water Cycle, Drainage basins and processes, River processes, How do rivers change from source to mouth, Factors contributing to floods and how flood risk can be reduced, Flooding case study including human and physical causes, effects and responses Anthropocene Geological timescale – setting the scene for the Anthropocene, Setting out of the impacts of CC, Is climate change irreversible? Anthromes or biomes? (e.g. deforestation, desertification, endangered species), Why are some people more affected by climate change than others? How can humans live more sustainably? Why is international agreement and collaboration needed to tackle climate change? Coasts & Rivers. This includes key processes, landforms, management types and a case study location. Coasts & Rivers. This includes key processes, landforms, management types and a case study location.
Autumn 2 Coastal Environments Coastal processes, Characteristics of waves, Factors influencing erosion, Process of longshore drift and formation of spits, Features formed by erosion, Features formed by deposition, Management of coastal erosion and flood risk, Case study of coastal erosion Weather hazards and Climate Change. This includes physical and human causes of climate change, atmospheric circulation and what determines local weather conditions. Also studied is examples of drought and hurricane events including causes, impacts and responses. Weather hazards and Climate Change. This includes physical and human causes of climate change, atmospheric circulation and what determines local weather conditions. Also studied is examples of drought and hurricane events including causes, impacts and responses.
Spring 1 Population, settlements and migration Population numbers and density for the UK, The census, Global distribution of population, The causes of the rise or fall of the population, Population growth and resource consumption, The reasons for the site, shape, situation, Growth and nature of individual settlements, Settlement hierarchy, Patterns and changes in urban land use, Management of urban population and urban development, types and causes of migration Tectonic Hazards The structure of the Earth, The theory of continental drift and tectonic plate boundaries and reasons for plate movement, Earthquakes – how they occur, how they vary in intensity, how they are measured and their impacts, Volcanoes – how are the formed, types of volcanoes, and impacts, Positive and negatives of living in tectonically active areas, Predicting, preparing for and responding to tectonic hazards, living in an earthquake zone is managed, Impacts, responses and management of a tectonic hazard through a case studies (LIC/HIC) Global ecosystems, Cold Environments and Glaciation Global distribution and characteristics of biomes, Biodiversity and value of ecosystems (goods and services), Types of cold environments, Global distribution of glaciers, Effects of climate change, Impacts of climate change on cold environments, International responses to climate change, Glacial movement, Glacial processes, Glacial landforms, Case study - Human use of a glaciated upland area Weather hazards and Climate Change. This includes physical and human causes of climate change, atmospheric circulation and what determines local weather conditions. Also studied is examples of drought and hurricane events including causes, impacts and responses. Ecosystems. This unit focuses on natural ecosystems and in particular, Deciduous woodland and Tropical Rainforest. This will include understanding typical plant and animals types as well as climatic conditions present. There will be a case study for both ecosystems for how an area can be managed sustainably.
Spring 2 Ecosystems. This unit focuses on natural ecosystems and in particular, Deciduous woodland and Tropical Rainforest. This will include understanding typical plant and animals types as well as climatic conditions present. There will be a case study for both ecosystems for how an area can be managed sustainably. UK Challenges. This will be preparation for the synoptic part of the Paper 3 GCSE exam. This will focus on exam and writing skills as well as recapping key content from across the course.
Summer 1 Weather and Climate The difference between weather and climate, The water cycle, Weather systems and types of rainfall, the factors affecting climatic variation across the UK, The distribution and factors influencing climate zones Globalisation Primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary sectors, Measuring development, Patterns of wealth and development across the world, Development change over time, How sectors work together to make an economy through a supply chain of a product (e.g. iPhone), Global trade, multinational corporations, Emerging economies, Case Study of TNCs Global Development Different ways of defining development and measures of development, Factors contributing to the development of a country, Global pattern of development, Impact of uneven development on the quality of life, International strategies used to reduce uneven development, Top-down and bottom-up development projects, Case study of developing or emerging country Changing Cities. Urbanisation, reasons for migration and impacts of rapid urbanisation. This will include Bristol Case Study for a city in a developed country. Revision and preparation for GCSE exams.
Summer 2 Fieldwork Enquiry Changing Cities. Urbanisation, reasons for migration and impacts of rapid urbanisation. This will include Sao Paulo Case Study for a city in a developing or emerging country. Year 11 students will sit their 3 GCSE exams subject to their formal exam timetable.

Geography

Why are we teaching a knowledge-rich curriculum; how is it different?

In geography we have thought carefully about what knowledge pupils need to retain and retrieve in the longer term, and which knowledge we need them to do work with. 

Within a knowledge-rich geography curriculum, pupils have an entitlement to a geographical education that draws upon geographical practices and approaches. 

 

Why are we teaching this content?

Geography is a subject for life – it is a subject that is embedded in the world around our pupils, so it is significant that they are well prepared to make sense of the world they live in. It is important that pupils reach the end of Key Stage 3 having learnt sufficient subject knowledge of geography. The curriculum should also serve as a foundation and long-term preparation for both GCSE and A-level geography.

We have designed the curriculum with the aim that  pupils learn the geographical content included within the Geography National Curriculum.   Working through this helped us map out across Year 7, 8 and 9 where pupils would encounter the curricular content that pupils would need to learn in order for them to appreciate the complexity of climate change and related geographical issues.

 

Why are we teaching it in this order? 

There is certain locational knowledge that we expect pupils to have acquired in Key Stage 1 and 2. The Key Stage 3 Curriculum does not suppose that this has been learnt by all pupils, and so there is opportunity in the autumn term of year 7 to ensure this knowledge is taught .We think this is important in terms of sequencing as it gives pupils a framework that enables them to understand the geographical significance of locations and relationships between places. Much of the KS3 curriculum focuses on the UK first before using wider examples. 


What do pupils need to remember and be able to do in this subject?

As geography teachers, we introduce pupils to a range of subject-specialist vocabulary that can be effectively used within pupils’ work. These key terms are embedded in our lessons and homework tasks so that KS3 pupils can ‘talk like a Geographer’. 

Pupils need to be able to understand that at the core of geography as a subject is the balance of the physical world and the influences of the humans that live in it. To support this, topics tend to rotate between human and physical geography so that pupils save strengths in both areas. 

 

What methods do we use to help pupils secure this knowledge in long-term memory? 

To embed the use of subject specific vocabulary, we use knowledge organisers and detailed lesson content to ensure pupils access the language and can use it correctly. In class we use knowledge quizzes in each lesson as well as frequent spelling tests to check for any gaps in understanding. 

To ensure fluency of map skills, we use extracts of OS, UK wide and world maps in every KS3 summative assessment. This ensures that skills are demonstrated frequently and supports the long term memory. 



 

Geography Curriculum Summary 2020-21